Llanrhystud Online https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk A village with a very interesting history Thu, 15 Oct 2020 19:36:08 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 https://i0.wp.com/www.llanrhystud.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/cropped-Flag-of-Australia-Design-by-Ivor-Evans-Llanrhystud.jpg?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 Llanrhystud Online https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk 32 32 121270471 Llanrhystud Memorial Hall Gets Re-painted https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/llanrhystud-memorial-hall-gets-re-painted/ Thu, 15 Oct 2020 19:07:10 +0000 https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/?p=6310 On Thursday the 15 October 2020, the front exterior gable end of Llanrhystud Memorial Hall, Ceredigion, was treated to a re-paint. Volunteers worked tirelessly throughout the day, giving the building a new lease of life. The Memorial Hall was originally opened in November 1929, built on land donated by the Rev. Charles Williams, Ashford Rectory, […]

The post Llanrhystud Memorial Hall Gets Re-painted appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
On Thursday the 15 October 2020, the front exterior gable end of Llanrhystud Memorial Hall, Ceredigion, was treated to a re-paint.

Llanrhystud Memorial Hall being re-painted
Llanrhystud Memorial Hall being re-painted

Volunteers worked tirelessly throughout the day, giving the building a new lease of life.

The Memorial Hall was originally opened in November 1929, built on land donated by the Rev. Charles Williams, Ashford Rectory, Barnstaple, Devon – as an expression of gratitude for the return of his two sons unscathed from the Great War.

At the time, money was raised by local bazaars, with the first instalment towards building the Memorial Hall raising £200.

The post Llanrhystud Memorial Hall Gets Re-painted appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
6310
Nanteos – The Dipping Pool – Book Launch by author Jane Blank https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/nanteos-the-dipping-pool-book-launch-by-author-jane-blank/ Thu, 24 Sep 2020 10:31:33 +0000 https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/?p=6237 On Friday 25 September, 2020, local author Jane Blank will launch her latest publication, Nanteos – The Dipping Pool, at Stordy Wyre & Post Office Llanrhystud. All welcome, come along and enjoy the excitement of the day!!! Jane’s latest novel, Nanteos: The Dipping Pool is companion to The Shadow of Nanteos, described by Robert Peston […]

The post Nanteos – The Dipping Pool – Book Launch by author Jane Blank appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
On Friday 25 September, 2020, local author Jane Blank will launch her latest publication, Nanteos – The Dipping Pool, at Stordy Wyre & Post Office Llanrhystud.

All welcome, come along and enjoy the excitement of the day!!!

Nanteos: The Dipping Pool by Jane Blank
Nanteos: The Dipping Pool by Jane Blank
Jane Blank authorJane’s latest novel, Nanteos: The Dipping Pool is companion to The Shadow of Nanteos, described by Robert Peston as “A wonderfully gothic evocation of Wild Wales”.

The second part of a Welsh historical series, seen as Ceredigion’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles, is published this week. Described as “lyrical, visceral and angry” Nanteos: The Dipping Pool is a gothic novel set against the dramatic backdrop of 1750s Cardiganshire.

Written by critically acclaimed novelist and poet Jane Blank, the book is both prequel and sequel to the 2015 bestseller The Shadow of Nanteos. Both novels are based on the Powell family of Nanteos mansion, located some 3 miles inland from Aberystwyth, with The Dipping Pool concentrating more on the workers and local people – the lead miners, tenant farmers, conjurors, fullers, midwives and gypsies.

“When I finished The Shadow of Nanteos I missed that world and the characters in it. Plas Nanteos is so much more than a gentry house. Estates like this one, which, in its heyday encompassed over 30,000 acres, were more mini ‘kingdoms’. Whole villages were owned and controlled by one family. I wanted not only to explore the lives of these squires, but also to move amongst the people who worked for them; people like my own ancestors on my mother’s side. On returning to the world of Nanteos, I enjoyed seeing the characters again – but many of them, for example Cai, I found had changed!”

Nanteos: The Dipping Pool starts five months prior to the Rev William Powell and his wife Elizabeth inheriting the mansion and explores the estate’s ‘back story’. For the next fourteen months, the narrative runs along the same time frame as the first novel, while characters on the fringes of the earlier book become the new main protagonists. Blank says, “The Shadow of Nanteos ended abruptly, so the sequel resolves this story, moving forwards to finish about five months after the original book ended. Whereas The Shadow of Nanteos has a relatively small cast of important characters and a tight, claustrophobic focus on the house and family, The Dipping Pool ranges wide across the vast Nanteos estate.”

Evoking a strong sense of place throughout and with real locations that readers can explore, this book is certain to appeal to anyone interested in gripping historical fiction and the rule of the gentry in rural Wales. Fusing privilege with tradition and superstition, the violent, secretive world of eighteenth-century Ceredigion is brought to brutal life.

Events

Live from Plas Nanteos: from October 8th for 7weeks, Jane Blank will be giving readings from and

exploring the background to, her new novel Nanteos: The Dipping Pool. Sessions will be streamed live from the mansion at 6pm every Thursday.

Praise for Nanteos: The Dipping Pool:

‘Draws us into a world of magic and enchantment, a world that is sensuous, thrilling, mystical – and dangerous.’ Professor Anne Rowe.

‘Pulls off that rarest of tricks – we pause to admire Blank’s style, then race to turn the page.’ Professor Richard Marggraf Turley

The Shadow of Nanteos tells of William Powell and his headstrong wife Elizabeth’s unexpected inheritance of the glorious Nanteos estate in Cardiganshire. On arrival, it seems their new life is everything they could wish for. But, as her debt-ridden husband is snared by the land disputes and violence of the ‘Cardiganshire Lead Wars’, Elizabeth, struggling to fit into her new role, is increasingly drawn to the mysterious figure of Cai, the estate’s handsome bailiff. Soon the family is caught up in a violent political and legal battle that will end in tragedy.

“A wonderfully gothic evocation of Wild Wales” Robert Peston

“Dark, dramatic and visceral.” Deborah Kay Davies

The Shadow of Nanteos was long listed for the Historical Novel Society awards and was Waterstones Wales Book of the Month.

The Author Jane Blank

Jane Blank grew up in Sheffield but often visited family in Ceredigion, hence the interest in the mysterious ‘Nanteos’. After studying English and Drama at UEA, she settled in Abergavenny to bring up her children, teaching in a Welsh language secondary school in Pontypool. After completing a Creative Writing MA in Cardiff, Jane has tutored and lectured extensively both in the UK and US in venues such as the National Library of Wales, Wales Millennium Centre, Aberystwyth University and at the Hay Festival. She now lives on a small holding in Ceredigion, working as a writing tutor and for an environmental charity.

Jane has written three novels to date, her work winning prizes and awards and being featured on television and radio and in numerous magazines and anthologies including Planet, New Welsh Review, Poetry Wales, Poetry Quarterly Review, The Western Mail, The Bronte Society Magazine, Big Issue, Observer Magazine and The Independent. She is a member of Literature Wales and is one of their ‘Writers on Tour’, regularly performing her work in public.

See Jane’s website for more details: www.jane-blank.info

Book Details

The paperback book, printed at Y Lolfa, Talybont, can be purchased for £9.99, and is available at all good book shops.

  • Department: Fiction
  • Format: Paperback | 357 pages
  • Dimensions: 130 x 195mm
  • Publication date: 21 September 2020
  • Publisher: Y Lolfa
  • Publication City/Country: Talybont, Wales, UK
  • Language: English
  • ISBN: 978-1-78461-877-3

Buy: Nanteos: The Dipping Pool

The post Nanteos – The Dipping Pool – Book Launch by author Jane Blank appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
6237
Cofiwch Dryweryn https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/cofiwch-dryweryn/ Mon, 21 Sep 2020 16:25:05 +0000 https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/?p=6221 Cofiwch Dryweryn on the A487 just north of the village of Llanrhystud, has recently under gone a transformation with the site being cleared and fenced with the erection of scaffolding for masonry work to begin. William Gapper and Justin Jenkins of Aberaeron, hope to complete the masonary work by Friday, reconstructing the mural to its […]

The post Cofiwch Dryweryn appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
Cofiwch Dryweryn on the A487 just north of the village of Llanrhystud, has recently under gone a transformation with the site being cleared and fenced with the erection of scaffolding for masonry work to begin.

Cofiwch Dryweryn restoration September 2020
Cofiwch Dryweryn restoration September 2020

William Gapper and Justin Jenkins of Aberaeron, hope to complete the masonary work by Friday, reconstructing the mural to its original state, using original stone and traditional building materials, with the help of historic photographs as reference material which date from 1965.

Left to Right: Justin Jenkins and William Gapper
Left to Right: Justin Jenkins and William Gapper

In recent years the site has suffered several attacks of vandalism, renewing calls for the sites protection.

Cofiwch Dryweryn Remembered

The mural marks the flooding of the Tryweryn valley, which contained the Welsh speaking village of Capel Celyn, near Bala.

The slogan was painted in 1965 after the village of Capel Celyn in Gwynedd was flooded to create a reservoir to provide water for Liverpool.


How do you remember Tryweryn Valley

Post your comments of what Cofiwch Dryweryn means to you, below!

The post Cofiwch Dryweryn appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
6221
Storm Francis Uncovers Llanrhystud’s ‘Lost’ Shoreline Forest https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/storm-francis-uncovers-llanrhystuds-lost-shoreline-forest/ Tue, 01 Sep 2020 11:11:52 +0000 https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/?p=6131 Borth’s forest has become associated with a 17th Century myth of a sunken civilization known as ‘Cantre’r Gwaelod’, or the ‘Sunken Hundred’. It is believed the area was a once-fertile land and township protected by floodgates. Remains of tree stumps The remains of the forest’s tree stumps, are well preserved, having been exposed by the […]

The post Storm Francis Uncovers Llanrhystud’s ‘Lost’ Shoreline Forest appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>

Llanrhystud’s Lost Forest

A prehistoric forest which was buried under water and sand possibly more than 4,500 years ago has been uncovered by Storm Francis, 2020.

The petrified trees can be seen lying on Llanrhystud’s beach in Ceredigion county.

Borth’s forest has become associated with a 17th Century myth of a sunken civilization known as ‘Cantre’r Gwaelod’, or the ‘Sunken Hundred’.

It is believed the area was a once-fertile land and township protected by floodgates.

Remains of tree stumps

The remains of the forest’s tree stumps, are well preserved, having been exposed by the storm moving vast quantities of stones, revealing the subsoil, peat and tree stumps.

Myths and Legends

According to one of several myths, ‘Cantre’r Gwaelod’ extended some 20 miles west of the current shoreline into what is now Cardigan Bay.

Could the land and myth extend as far south as Llanrhystud?

  • Storm Francis reveals lost forest on Llanrhystud beach
  • Lost forest on Llanrhystud beach
  • Llanrhystud coastline forest
  • Tree stumps emerge on Llanrhystud beach
  • Coastline forest at Llanrhystud

The post Storm Francis Uncovers Llanrhystud’s ‘Lost’ Shoreline Forest appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
6131
Llanrhystyd – Study of its Social Geography 1957 https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/llanrhystyd-study-of-its-social-geography-1957/ Thu, 20 Aug 2020 07:34:35 +0000 https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/?p=6065 Information provided by Marsia Thompson Introduction This essay attempts to show the present (1957) social geography of a village near the North Cardiganshire coast which has always been regarded as something of a frontier between North and South Wales. The basis of the essay has been the preparation of detailed tables of the houses population […]

The post Llanrhystyd – Study of its Social Geography 1957 appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
Information provided by Marsia Thompson

Introduction

This essay attempts to show the present (1957) social geography of a village near the North Cardiganshire coast which has always been regarded as something of a frontier between North and South Wales. The basis of the essay has been the preparation of detailed tables of the houses population occupation and social characteristics etc. Some of this information has been converted to map form while in the text an analysis is made of statistical information. The collection of information was carried out mainly by the writer in January 1957, supplemented by family information and one or two older residents of the village with a lifelong interest in the history of the village. Special thanks to Mr E. T. Price.

The historical information is largely oral tradition but I have consulted the Tithe map of 1845 and varying Ordnance Survey editions of the local sheet. The location of the post 1945 buildings was filled in by myself (Marsia Thompson).

Background Information
Physical Background
Historical Background
House Types

Analysis of the Present Community

Population and Age Groups
Occupation

Language Education and Social Features

Language
Education
Religion
Social Features

Conclusion

Background Information

Physical Background

The area studied has been confined to the village of Llanrhystud itself as the settlement lies across the boundaries of two parishes in North Cardiganshire. This boundary is the river Wyre a stream about 10 miles long which follows East North East to West South West, immediately south of the 400 foot coastal plateau, extending from immediately south of Aberystwyth to the well known stretch of coastal lowland that lies between Llanrhystud and Morfa Mawr.

The village itself is located between the fifty and one hundred foot contour in a sheltered situation about three quarters of a mile from the sea where there is a break of slope which occurs in the river bed (the weir below the village bridge) It is built above flood level on an alluvial plain which grades gently on to the excellent soils of the coastal lowland. This has obviously been levelled by marine action at some period and subsequently uplifted and consists of fairly light glacial clays and sands. There is some degree of coastal erosion but this is not as rapid as in the case of Llanon beach two miles to the south. The beach near Llanrhystud is more of the storm beach type and resembles that of Borth but on a smaller scale.

The village in its physical location resembles Llanbadarn near Aberystwyth to some extent and the historical evidence considered later supports this view.

The village really consists of a series of dwellings mainly terraced but with some detached and semidetached houses extending along three roads from the village center near the bridge with its small square flanked by two Inns. The three streets are Aberystwyth road the Llanon road and the Cross Inn road. The church which is nineteenth century built is on the site of a much older foundation about one hundred yards from the bridge with a small street of houses approaching it.

All the houses considered in this essay are within four hundred yards of the bridge over the Wyre with the exception of the two former mansions Which were the houses of the estate owners of the district. Two closest towns. Aberystwyth is nine miles to the north and Aberaeron eight miles to the south.

Top

Historical Background

Although this essay is concerned with the present day social geography of the area it is necessary to consider briefly the historical Background which has resulted in the growth of a settlement of fairly considerable size (299 persons) This represents a pattern not generally characteristic of rural Wales even though there are several villages of considerable size in North Cardiganshire.

It has not been possible in a study of this size to examine original documents However Professor E. G. Bowen in his book “ The Settlements of Celtic Saints in Wales” states on page 92 that Saint Rhystud to whom the parish church is dedicated was one of the followers of Saint Cadfan the leader of the Peregrini who are thought to have moved from Brittany to Wales during the dark ages. The outstanding feature of this movement was that the saints who established these churches in Wales arrived by sea. Another ecclesiastical settlement in the area associated with the Cadfan movement is Llanilar. The Llan in a place name has the basic meaning of a clearing or an open space as kept in the word Llanerch ( a green glade) originally in forested country eg as in Llanerchaeron. In this instance it means land consecrated either to or by a Saint Rhystud. Llan at the present time has come to be used in its secondary meaning signifying the church and also as the settlement

The physical location of the settlement already described is somewhat paralleled by these of Llanilar and Llanafan also located on alluvial plains.

In W. J. Lewis’s Ceredigion: Atlas Hanesyddol Three castles are shown in and around Llanrhystud Two being named Castell Bach and Castell Mawr, a house situated behind a mound is still named Castell Bach. (mound was removed to allow for road widening opp Memorial Hall ). The Wyre valley has a number of earth works. By the Middle Ages it was apparent that a distinct boundary existed in this area between North and South

A monograph has been published by Mr Beynon Davies Ardwyn Grammer School in the Bulletin of the board of Celtic Studies (volume 14 part 4 May 1952). It noted that dialect and customs in Llanrhystud had far more in common with the vale of Aeron than Llanon 2 miles down the road. This may be due to the route way built as a turnpike road in 1770 and still used by motorists as a shortcut to Lampeter. The tradition of this difference is a long standing one with rivalry between the villages of Llanrhystud and Llanon still evident.

Llanrhystud appears to be of little significance during the late Middle Ages but during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries it had a new lease on life as a ship building center constructing small wooden craft.It is to this period that the village owes its existence in its present form.

The list of approximate dates of construction of many of the houses listed in the appendix shows a that many of the present buildings though now much changed were built during this period. The apparent location of the yard was to the south of the village not far from the lime kilns called Craig Las

Ships of from a hundred to a hundred and fifty tons were built here with timber being sourced from as far afield as Llandovery. The Cardiganshire coast was well known during this period for its construction of small wooden barques but the industry declined towards the end of the nineteenth century due to the introduction of larger steam ships. The Craiglas shipyard ceased to build ships after 1902 when the barque Martha Jane was wrecked when it was unable to gain access to the open sea during a rising gale.

Llanrhystud had also enjoyed some coastal trade particularly in the movement of lime, for which carts came from Mynydd Bach and Tregaron. This coastal trade was ruined by the advent of the railway to Tregaron and Aberystwyth in 1867*. Other local industries included an eighteenth century wooden mill, whose machinery is now preserved at The National Museum of Wales. There was also a Pandy or Fulling Mill, and of the three corn mills one is still worked. The turnpike road from Aberystwyth to Aberaeron was opened in 1770 and the Mynydd Bach route to Temple Bar is also shown as being opened in the same year.*

The decline of shipbuilding and other local trades has changed part of the character of Llanrhystud during the present century. The village might have suffered a serious decline were it not for the development of modern road transport.

  • W. J. Lewis “Ceredigion: Atlas Hanesyddol”. Page 42
    The Vale of Aeron light rail from Lampeter to Aberaeron was not opened until 1911 It completely destroyed the remaining coastal trade of Aberaeron in turn the railway was discontinued in 1951. Interesting to note that the railway station in Llanfarian was called Llanrhystud Road

Top

House Types

Early view of Church Street Llanrhystud
Early view of Church Street Llanrhystud

There is a variety of house types in the Llanrhystud village. A number of houses are believed to date to the 1600 period*, ( this is the considered view of local Antiquarians. The village of Llanrhystud with its Church is shown on Speeds map of Cardiganshire 1610 reproducedin W. J. Lewis’s op cat page 24) but in every case the buildings have been changed or re built to such an extent that they would be unrecognisable by their original occupants. In their present form they owe much to nineteenth century styles, with rather primitive stone dressings. Examples of these re-built styles are found in Church Street and also the Red Lion.

The Black Lion was originally built in 1759. The Black and Red Lion are the 2 survivors of several Inns which existed up to 1900 the time that the shipyard ceased. Both Inns have retained a reasonably attractive appearance characteristic of buildings rebuilt during the Victorian era Photo No 6 shows a detached house which has been rebuilt This building is single story and was formerly the cowsheds of a farm house. It is characterised by very thick walls ( 3 feet) and there is still thatch under the corrugated roof.

The present church of St Rhystud was built in 1852 around the older foundation there is a sketch in W. J. Lewis op, cit, page 26. Re building was a common practice in west wales at this time the best known example being Llanbadarn Church.

The second main group consists of nineteenth century houses mainly of the terraced type (Moelivor Terrace) Until recently this row of houses housed various craftsmen eg a Sadler, and blacksmith. In style they are stone built houses of typically Victorian appearance.

A more exotic type of dwelling built in the late nineteenth century were built by sea captains. These houses were large with several rooms but without the superficial verandas which characterised the sea captains houses built in nearby Llanon and Aberarth An example would be Candor. Since 1950 one still active sea captain has built a house in the village but this is of modern style.

There are two former Mansion Houses belonging to the two estates which owned the land in and around Llanrhystud. Mabws Hall in its present form is dated at 1765* (by a local Antiquary also shown in W. J. Lewis op cit as a gentleman’s house of the Tudor Period Page 22) is now occupied by a farmer. It does not have any special architectural features and is not as pleasant in appearance as some of the late eighteenth century houses in Aberystwyth.

Alltlwyd Mansion was built in 1828 and is now used as a guest house. It has an attractive outlook on to the main Llanon road and the sea. It is the sort of country house seen all over Wales.

Private building during 1930 – 1950 consisted of one house. Two groups of council houses one of the Airey type and the other of a more traditional type of construction Both sets were built after 1945 government policy encouraging the building of houses for agricultural workers but the rents were too high for most Agricultural workers Some houses were occupied under the national assistance rental scheme.

The council houses have added considerably to the population of the village It is noted that only one is occupied by an agricultural worker.

Though little private building has taken place in recent years this not due to lack of demand but due to the reluctance of farmers to sell land Dior building. Now the land of the Black Lion Farm owned by Roberts Brewery is to be sold as building plots which will see an increase in the building of private dwellings in the future.

Top

Analysis of the Present Community

Population and Age Groups

The present population of the village of Llanrhystud when this summary was revised in April 1957 was 299 (150 males and 149 females) This shows a remarkable balance between the sexes which is not generally a characteristic of North Cardiganshire villages

An outstanding feature of the Llanrhystud community is its general youthful character as compared with most Cardiganshire villages. The largest age group is that under 20 years with 97 persons (56 between 0-10 and 41 between 10-20) This reflects the young families in the Rural District Council Houses and it is significant that there is another large group between 20-40 (67 persons) This group is more widely distributed throughout the village.

There are comparatively few persons in the 40-60 age group (77persons) With (58persons) in the over 60 age group.

Comparison is made between Llanrhystud and Llanon in a Population of 448 persons in the 60 – 80 age group there were 146 persons 97 women and 49 men.

Top

Occupation

The occupations of Llanrhystud people are now very varied. It is not easy to group these occupations together. The largest single group is that connected with agriculture, with 33 persons who are either owners of small holdings situated in the village or owners of farms very near the village or as farm labourers who live in the village and travel to work by bicycle. ( The outward movement of farm workers is more characteristic of English villages than the dispersed settlements of Rural Wales. In part it reflects the importance of small holdings and arable farming on the lowland coastal strip which on a small scale parallels the farming practices of the vale of Glamorgan which is the major center of neucleated arable villages in Wales.)

It is noticeable that the two Inns of the village both have their own small holdings in the village and one market garden. The small holdings (which range from 5 – 25 acres) support a few cows sheep a pig and a few chickens. Together with growing of some fodder crops mainly root crops. The market garden produces flowers as well as vegetables and the owner has a shop and van for local distribution. The growing number of visitors who stay in the village or belong to the rapidly growing number of campers provide a seasonal market for the vegetable crops and local milk supplies.

The larger farms (100 – 150 acres) in the neighbourhood are mixed in character with an emphasis on Dairying but the excellent quality of the lowland soil means that there is an emphasis on arable crops than is generally typical of North Cardiganshire. There is hardly any rough grazing and the arable crops consist of hay (sown grasses) roots and corn. (Corn is the name given to mixed cereal crops in west Wales The fields are usually a mixture of wheat oats and barley but in the district there are one or two fields of pure wheat which is grown most years).

The second major group is concerned with travelling to Aberystwyth. The individual occupations vary considerably from shop assistant to a number of craftsmen mainly associated with the building trade. Several of these travel by lorry or van but 17 persons travel daily which runs every hour. This reflects the importance of public transport to these villages where opportunities of local employment are limited. All secondary school children also travel by bus either to Aberystwyth or Aberaeron.

The influence of Llanrhystud as a centre on the main coast road but serving a local hinterland is reflected in the number of postmen living in the village 6 persons. They work part time as postmen/ women and also assist on delivery of meat and bread as well as assisting on the local farms at harvest time. This is a well known feature of the North Cardiganshire countryside.

Llanrhystud has had like Llanon a considerable tradition of seafaring. However for a number of reasons this is on the decline and only four men living locally are still at sea and in each case are over 40 years of age. Three are merchant navy sea captains and the other is an engineering officer with the Cunard line. There are two retired captains living in the village.

It is interesting to note that most of the girls who attend Ardwyn grammer school go away to train mainly as nurses or teachers.

Top

Language Education and Social Features

Language

The everyday language in the village is Welsh. Out of the 96 families listed 72 are welsh speaking.It is noted that most of the English speaking families comprise mothers who are welsh speaking and local and English speaking fathers who have settled in the area and who live mainly in the Council Houses. Seven families have come from London, some during the Second World War. Others are the adult children of local people who went to London at the beginning of the 20th century and have returned to the village. Other families have come from Llanilar and Llangwyryfon in recent years as Council houses are available to residents from Rural districts rather than parishes.

It is noted regarding the language that even though English is spoken at home welsh is still the “play” language and for general conversation Subjects in school are taught in English.

Top

Education

Llanrhystud had a circulating school for a short period in the Eighteenth century subsequently a “ Church National School “ was built near the church. The present

Village school was also a National School and now serves Llanrhystud and Llanddeiniol

The school is now a busy one because of the increasing number of children in the 0 – 10 age group. Children over eleven years of age attend either the Grammarn or Modern school in Aberystwyth or the Bilateral School In Aberaeron. At present it is possible for children to choose which town they would prefer before sitting the entrance exam.

Top

Religion

The customary division between church and chapel reflects the traditional influence of the Local landowning families. The Hughes family of Alltlwyd and the Phillips family of Mabws refused in the nineteenth century to sell any land for the building of a nonconformist chapel.

The present Methodist chapel is situated nearly a mile from the village on the hill leading to Cross Inn and Lampeter. The majority of villagers attend Church services although somewhat irregularly. Most of the services are held in Welsh. By contrast the Welsh Methodist Chapel drawes most of its congregation from the surrounding country side and only 17 families from the village attend this Chapel. The small Welsh Baptist Chapel is supported by 10 families most coming from other districts.

Top

Social Features

Llanrhystud partly because of its youthful age structure has a vigorous community social life. The most active organisation being the Women’s Institute It is noticeable that even in such a Welsh speaking village as Llanrhystud most of the lectures are given in English. Otherwise most of the villages social business is conducted in Welsh. Eg Parish Council. Meetings. The young farmers club is now defunct due to the absence of a suitable leader rather than lack of interest. Extra mural classes are well attended Concerts (mainly in Welsh) are frequent .

Llanrhystud having the advantage of a village hall unlike Llanon.

The general impression is that the village Inns play a large part in the social life of the village than is normally the case in Rural Cardiganshire. This may be due to a geographical and historical reasons

  1. As previously noted Llanrhystud is a church rather than a Methodist village with different conventional ideas. It is noticeable that the Inns are visited by young men from the neighbouring parishes of Llanddeiniol and Llangwyryfon which are more strongly Methodist
  2. It has already been mentioned that Llanrhystud has something of the character of an English agricultural village with several farm workers living in the village rather than on isolated farms

Apart from local entertainment the young people of Llanrhystud look to Aberystwyth for other entertainment eg cinemas. Most of the young people will travel by bus to Aberystwyth on Saturday evenings the good local bus service has already been noted.

On the occasions when there is local entertainment in the village hall there is a considerable influx of older people into the village from the surrounding countyside.

Top

Conclusion

Llanrhystud presents as a picture of a main road community with deep roots in Agriculture but whose size is more related to the local industries of the past. The buildings in their present form show the period at which the village emerged. It has ha a new infusion of life with the construction of the council houses with consequent effect on the age structure of the community. Many of the local people are dependent on transport to get to their work in other areas as there is not enough locally to support the population. The village remains characteristically Welsh in language despite some “foreign” invasions in recent years. Some of the social geographical features have been seen to be more English than Welsh.

By Marsia Thompson

House
Name
Date
of Build
InhabitantsMale
Age
Female
Age
LanguageFamily originOccupationMode of TransportReligion
Clarence189531. 60 – 701. 80+WelshLocalRetired farmersPrivate carC of E
1. 30 – 40
Nyth155021. 50 – 601. 50 – 60WelshLondonPlumberBusC of E
Gadlys155061. 40 – 501. 80+WelshLocalFarmerBicycleC of E
1. 40 -50Butcher
1. 10 – 20Part time postman
2. 0 – 10
Brooklands182071. 30 – 401. 80+BilingualGlasgowBakerVan
1. 10 – 201. 30 – 40
1. 0 – 101. 10 – 20
1. 0 – 10
Angorfa182051. 40 – 501. 30 – 40WelshTreorchy1. Sea captainBusC of E
1. 30 – 401. 30 – 401. Mkt Gardner
1. 10 – 20
Tegfan160021. 80+1. 80+WelshLocalRetired roadmanBusC of E
Neuadd182051. 90+1. 40 – 50WelshLlangeithoPlasterer
1. 40 – 501. 10 – 20
1. 10 – 20
Danybontbren160031. 60 – 701. 50 – 60WelshLlanonSea CaptainBusC of E
1. 10 – 20
Arnant182031. 10 – 201. 40 – 50WelshLocalBusC of E
1. 10 – 20
1 Glanrafon Tce185031. 60 – 701. 40 – 50WelshLocalFlour mill workerBusMethodist
1. 10 – 20Agri worker
No 2185011. 40 – 50WelshLocalCarC of E
No 3185021. 20- 301. 20 – 30WelshLlagwyryfonAgri workerBusC of E
No 4185041. 70 – 801. 60 – 70WelshLocalRetired Ag workerBusC of E
2. 20 – 30Sales assistant
Assistant cook
No 5
Dol Werdd195631. 40 – 501. 40 – 50WelshLocalBuilders clarkFirms vanBaptist
1. 10 – 20
Tanfoel160021. 60 – 70BilingualLondonSmallholdingBusBaptist
1. 50 – 60Pennant
Britannia18501WelshLocalUnemployedBusBaptist
Ystradteilo188531. 60 – 701. 60 – 70WelshLocalFarmerBusC of E
1. 60 – 70Farm labourer
Felindre189051. 50 – 601. 40 -50BilingualLlanilarPoultry farmerCar / BusC of E
3 10 – 20PBS assistant
Felin Ganol160031. 80+1. 80+WelshLocalRetired tea merchantCar / BusBaptist
1. 20 – 30Flour millers
Glennydd187011. 40 – 50BilingualLondonDress makerBusC of E

The post Llanrhystyd – Study of its Social Geography 1957 appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
6065
Broadband Upgrade Fund launched in Ceredigion – how to get grants for 1 gigabit download speeds https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/broadband-upgrade-fund-launched-in-ceredigion-how-to-get-grants-for-1-gigabit-download-speeds/ Wed, 05 Aug 2020 07:28:30 +0000 https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/?p=6043 The Government’s Broadband Upgrade Fund campaign has launched in Ceredigion to help businesses, employees and countryside communities take advantage of all the benefits associated with faster and more reliable internet connections. How long do I have?Our community has until 30 September 2020 to register as much interest as possible to grow our Broadband Upgrade Fund. […]

The post Broadband Upgrade Fund launched in Ceredigion – how to get grants for 1 gigabit download speeds appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
The Government’s Broadband Upgrade Fund campaign has launched in Ceredigion to help businesses, employees and countryside communities take advantage of all the benefits associated with faster and more reliable internet connections.

How long do I have?
Our community has until 30 September 2020 to register as much interest as possible to grow our Broadband Upgrade Fund.

👉 Tell your friends and neighbours to register!

‼ Register to upgrade your broadband today ‼
As a rural resident or business, you could be entitled to a broadband upgrade paid for by the government.

Who’s eligible?
Rural residents and businesses (SMEs) with broadband speeds of less than 100Mbps could be eligible for the Broadband Upgrade Fund.

Who’s in the pilot?
The Broadband Upgrade Fund is a pilot campaign available to rural premises in Cornwall, Carmarthenshire, Ceredigion, Pembrokeshire, Cumbria and Northumberland.

What is the fund?
The funding is available as small grants known as vouchers worth up to £3,500 for each small and medium-sized business (SMEs), and up to £1,500 per residential property.

Who gets the funding?
Once you have created enough interest in your area or community, the fund that you generate goes direct to your chosen supplier to offset the cost of delivering the improved service.

More 👉
https://broadband-upgrade-fund.campaign.gov.uk/register

The post Broadband Upgrade Fund launched in Ceredigion – how to get grants for 1 gigabit download speeds appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
6043
Repainting Ceredigion Milestones https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/repainting-ceredigion-milestones/ Mon, 27 Jul 2020 10:01:40 +0000 https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/?p=6023 I caught up with Philip Dennis to find out a little more about him and why he has started repainting the local Ceredigion milestones. Philip a former Head of Maths  at Penglais school, has lived in the area for 21 years. A former Chartered Surveyor, he moved down from Harrogate. Having being educated in Cardiff, […]

The post Repainting Ceredigion Milestones appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
I caught up with Philip Dennis to find out a little more about him and why he has started repainting the local Ceredigion milestones.

Philip a former Head of Maths  at Penglais school, has lived in the area for 21 years. A former Chartered Surveyor, he moved down from Harrogate. Having being educated in Cardiff, Philip had a desire to return home to Wales. He became interested in the milestones on his daily commute to and from school, often seeing them in hedgerows, looking neglected and over grown. It was these that started him looking for more. Slowly but surely Philip is uncovering some forgotten milestones along the B4337.

Photo of Philip Dennis, Ceredigion Milestone painter.

Philip has painted 8 milestones to date, with more being rediscovered in various forms of a state of neglect.

I was speaking to a lady at Perris Garage just the other day, she was interested in it as neither she nor her husband had seen it before.

After carrying out some research I was a bit disappointed to find these are not as early as I had expected, I thought they would have dated to the turnpike days, 1790s, but it looks like these were replaced in 1896 by the council at that time. These were made by a firm in Llanddewi Brefi, possibly made of concrete rather than stone. This could be why parts of the face of the milestone’s flake off.

Philip is interested to know if Llanrhystud had a tollgate, which controlled the coast road, possibly somewhere where the B4337 meets the now A487. Aberystwyth tollgate is now relocated at St Fagans museum, Cardiff, and there looks like, what appears to be a tollgate as you enter Aberaeron, coming from the north of the county.

B4337 Milestones

I understand there are ten milestones between Llanrhystud and where the road meets the A482, Aberaeron, Lampeter road at Temple Bar.

Philip would like to find and paint the ten.

Philip first painted the one in Cross Inn some 16 years ago, and just before the Corona Virus lockdown he painted that one once again.

Painting Milestones

Using a stiff brush, I take the moss of to create a sound foundation, I’ve found them very difficult to paint, though the white coat only takes 5-6 minutes, I find the brush tends to stutter as you go along the surface of the stone. When dry I go back and paint the lettering which can take up to three quarters of an hour. So, between cutting back the overgrowth and painting each milestone, these can take up to one and half hours in total.

Ceredigion Milestone History

In 1896, the committee for the north of the county agreed to order 44 new milestones from Messrs Rees Edwards and Co. of Llanddewi Brefi at 25 shillings each (£1.25) including engraving and delivery. A few earlier stones survive, in addition to the cast-iron posts made in 1894.

There were around 200 milestones erected in Ceredigion, erected along roads that were improved or established by the Turnpike Trustees, formed by acts of Parliament for Cardiganshire in 1770, 1791, 1813, 1833 and 1835.Presumably milestones were erected at every mile along these Turnpike roads.

There were 22 toll gates at the time of the Rebecca Riots (1843-1844): these were reduced to 16 by 1864. The collection of tolls ceased on the 1st April, 1889.

There are now around 100 milestones left in the county of Ceredigion.

Reference: Ceredigion Milestones

The post Repainting Ceredigion Milestones appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
6023
Llanrhystud PO and Stores in New Hands https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/llanrhystud-po-and-stores-in-new-hands/ Mon, 06 Jul 2020 20:45:42 +0000 https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/?p=5907 Exciting times for Llanrhystud PO & Stores, as Bethan and Martin Jenkins, are the new owners of the village shop. They took over on the 21 June 2020. During a brief catch up with the couple, we find out about their working lives and what they have planned for the shop. You can already see […]

The post Llanrhystud PO and Stores in New Hands appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
Exciting times for Llanrhystud PO & Stores, as Bethan and Martin Jenkins, are the new owners of the village shop. They took over on the 21 June 2020. During a brief catch up with the couple, we find out about their working lives and what they have planned for the shop. You can already see the difference and the stamp of their own personalities, with plenty to look forward too, which includes a re-brand and a new retail purchasing website.

Llanrhystud Post Office

Martin has worked for the Post Office since 1976, some of you may remember him from behind the counter of Aberystwyth Post Office. Bethan worked for the NHS for 26 years, leaving 2 years ago, to work along side Business Wales, the work inspired Bethan to take on a new adventure, running the local village shop.

Both Martin and Bethan speak Welsh and have two young children who go to the local village school, Ysgol Myfenydd. These future shop keepers are very excited their parents have brought the village store, a life changing experience for the whole family, who are honoured to serve the local community.

What are the shops opening hours?

  • Monday to Friday, 8am to 5pm
  • Saturday, 8am to 3pm
  • Sunday, 9am to 12 midday

Whats planned for the village stores?

Martin and Bethan Jenkins new owners of Llanrhystud PO and Stores
Martin and Bethan Jenkins new owners of Llanrhystud PO and Stores

The plan is to turn it from a convenience store to a market store, geared toward a one stop shop, where you buy local! The main thing is to introduce what a lot of customers in the village have asked for, we are totally geared up to supporting the community and to ensure that we serve the community, by introducing fresh food, fruit and veg within the store.

They are also opening a gift shop within the business and of course, if you haven’t heard already, Blodau’r Bedol will be moving to the premises operating from the garage, so lots to look forward too.

For us, our main thing is sustainability and promoting local stockists, and looking at supporting small businesses, to showing case local talent from Welsh honey to craft items made in Wales.

What delivery service will you be providing?

The idea is to open a delivery service within a three mile radius of the shop, orders will be taken online through our new website, where you will be able to see what the shop has on offer online, including special offers! Providing deliveries to anyone who needs it, including the caravan sites, so we have a facility to assist the community, taking it to the people. Especially in the last few months during COVID-19, we know there is a call for it, where people in the community find it difficult to get to the shops or can’t carry as many goods as they can. So, we are here to assist, what ever we can do for you and the community.

Have you enjoyed your first week of trading?

We've injected colour along with personality, including items of Welsh county furniture, the first item being a Welsh dresser
We’ve injected colour along with personality, including items of Welsh county furniture, the first item being a Welsh dresser

Its been great, its been wonderful catching up with people we haven’t seen for a long time, (we’ve spent hours chatting) we are honoured that we are here. We are going to try and do a lot more community based events, supporting the school and individuals in the community.

Both are keen to promote the Welshness of our area, here in Ceredigion, its been a joy and ever so busy. We are not shying away from the work, its been great, its been wonderful, as you can see its a transition, if it was just us coming in selling the same old, that wouldn’t have been a problem, but we are keen to change things. We’ve injected colour to the interior along with personality, including items of Welsh county furniture and antiques, the first item being a Welsh dresser.

We are looking to become plastic free within our first year, and introduce bespoke wooden display stands. We plan for everything in the shop to be Welsh, and everything we buy supporting a Welsh business, and that’s what we are keen to do, along side, fair trade items. So if there is anyone in the community who is interested in promoting there items, craft, talent or what ever they have on the farm, we are open to and welcome new suggestions.

We want to spark a little more interest, to get people thinking and excited about shopping here, and seeing what the shop has to offer.

The post Llanrhystud PO and Stores in New Hands appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
5907
Llanrhystud Coronavirus Support Group https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/llanrhystud-coronavirus-support-group/ Sun, 19 Apr 2020 09:05:15 +0000 https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/?p=5327 The Llanrhystud Coronavirus Support Group, is a community group set up to support residents of Llanrhystud during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis. Help is provided in various forms, including: Collections of groceries and prescriptions Phone befriending services Financial advice IT and tech support Emergency building repairs Crafts advice and supplies Financial assistance for the most vulnerable […]

The post Llanrhystud Coronavirus Support Group appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
The Llanrhystud Coronavirus Support Group, is a community group set up to support residents of Llanrhystud during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis.

Help is provided in various forms, including:

  • Collections of groceries and prescriptions
  • Phone befriending services
  • Financial advice
  • IT and tech support
  • Emergency building repairs
  • Crafts advice and supplies
  • Financial assistance for the most vulnerable
  • Employment advice
  • Non contact nursing and caring advice
  • Cooking advice
  • Scam awareness and community policing advice

Help is at hand to support you and your loved ones or if you are after some friendly advice, the group is here to assist in anyway it can!

Full details of the support provided and how you can help are found on their website: https://llanrhystudcovidaid.com/

Llanrhystud Supporting our Key Workers and the NHS

Here are a couple of photographs from around the village of Llanrhystud, in support of our Key Workers and the NHS, Diolch!

  • Llanrhystud Coronavirus Support Group
  • Llanrhystud Supports the NHS
  • NHS Support Llanrhystud
  • Stay safe Covid-19 Llanrhystud

Looking out for each other

Welsh Government has launched a looking out for each other campaign to give people advice and inspiration to navigate these trying times, whether that’s through volunteering, keeping connected or staying mentally and physically active.

Here’s a short film, voiced by Michael Sheen, on things people can do to look out for each other https://bit.ly/34n10VV

Gwefan Cymraeg: https://llyw.cymru/iach-a-diogel
English website: https://gov.wales/safe-help
• Facebook: @LookingOutForEachOtherSafely
• Twitter: @WG_Communities @LlC_Cymunedau

Ceredigion Support Groups and Information

The latest news from Ceredigion County Council:
http://www.ceredigion.gov.uk/coronavirus

Ceredigion Coronavirus Support
We can help each other out as a community by sharing knowledge, advice and practical support support. There may be members of the community who can’t get out to shops, or who will need people to help care for their pets should they be taken into hospital, we can all do our bit to make sure people get the help and support they need.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/CeredigionCoronavirusSupport/

The post Llanrhystud Coronavirus Support Group appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
5327
The Llanrhystud Heating Oil Club https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/the-llanrhystud-heating-oil-club/ Sun, 05 Apr 2020 13:26:56 +0000 https://www.llanrhystud.co.uk/?p=5205 The Oil Club are currently offering a very competitive price for domestic heating oil at: £0.3285 pence per litre (excluding VAT). Membership is free! Terms: Orders with payment information submitted by 11.30am, the morning of Monday, 6 April 2020, will be included with this order. Recent Price History (ex VAT)27/03/2020 £0.329313/03/2020 £0.450106/03/2020 £0.387728/02/2020 £0.396321/02/2020 £0.395014/02/2020 […]

The post The Llanrhystud Heating Oil Club appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
The Oil Club are currently offering a very competitive price for domestic heating oil at: £0.3285 pence per litre (excluding VAT). Membership is free!

Terms: Orders with payment information submitted by 11.30am, the morning of Monday, 6 April 2020, will be included with this order.

Recent Price History (ex VAT)
27/03/2020 £0.3293
13/03/2020 £0.4501
06/03/2020 £0.3877
28/02/2020 £0.3963
21/02/2020 £0.3950
14/02/2020 £0.4155

The Llanrhystud Heating Oil Club currently has 71 members, and the more that join the lower the price!

The post The Llanrhystud Heating Oil Club appeared first on Llanrhystud Online.

]]>
5205