Llanrhystud beach is made up of a narrow shingle bank at high tide and at low tide it becomes a sandy beach with rock pools, ideal for leisure activities or to just relax and enjoy the coastal views of Llanrhystud. Popular during the summer months for water sports including boating, windsurfing, swimming and fishing. Located off the A487 road in the county of Ceredigion, nine miles South of Aberystwyth, Wales.

Contents

Llanrhystud Beach Guide – OS Ref: SN523691

Its possible to park right on the pebble bank behind the beach, accessible from a little road heading towards the coast, just south of the village of Llanrhystud on the A487.

View of Llanrhystud beach looking North towards Aberystwyth
View of Llanrhystud beach looking North towards Morfa and Pengarreg Caravan Parks and a distant view Aberystwyth.

Beach Photo’s
Llanrhystud beach at low tide becomes a sandy beach with rock pools
Llanrhystud sandy beach at low tide
Image of one of the lime kilns over looking Llanrhystud Beach
Lime kilns overlooking beach & Cardigan Bay
Evidence of the former harbour at Llanrhystud beach to serve the lime kilns is still evident today
Evidence of former maritime history

Views of Llanrhystud beach & past maritime history

  • Beach Description
    A long, rural, storm terraced beach popular with visitors.
  • Water Quality
    A outfall discharges secondary treated effluent for some 1,200 people in the area.
  • Bathing Safety
    Considered safe for bathing with normal precautions. Emergency facilities available.
  • Litter
    The beach is cleaned daily between Easter and September. There are litter bins in the car park.
  • Beach Facilities
    Facilities available in the caravan park.
  • Seaside Activities
    Shallow waters for swimming.
  • Wildlife And Walks
    The beach is in a Special Landscape Area. There are five historic limekilns at the southern end of the beach. The beach is also part of the area that has been designated Heritage Coast.
  • Getting There
    Turn off A487 at Llanrhystud petrol station (south of Aberystwyth).
  • Parking
    There is free parking for 15 cars.
  • Public Transport
    The nearest train station is Aberystwyth. A bus service between Aberystwyth and Cardigan runs through Llanrhystud the village.

Llanrhystud beach location map

Beach Location:
Map of Llanrhystud Beach

Aerial view and map of Llanrhystud beach one of the best beaches near Aberystwyth.

News

2003 Crab invasion under the spotlight
Biggest influx of the crab species into the area in living memory. Reasons put forward for the migration from south Wales to waters around New Quay, Llanrhystud and Borth vary from climate change to a population explosion. But an expert in marine biology claims it is too early to be sure of the exact reason for the crustacean invasion. The creature lives on sand and amongst rocks down to about 50 metres in depth. But it comes inshore in large numbers in summer to moult and mate forming huge writhing mounds of crabs and empty shells.

Fears that Llanrhystud Beach will be lost
A former Llanrhystud man is warning that the village will lose its beach unless erosion work is undertaken soon. John hughes, who now lives in Bridgend, visits Llanrhystud regularly to see his sister, Muriel, who still lives here. And John is urging Ceredigion County Council or the Environment Agency to do something to stop the loss of the beach.

History

Llanrhystud – Llanon Lime Kilns over looking beach
Remains of Llanrhystud lime kilns, where limestone was burnt before being spread on the land to improve soil quality. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries lime was one of the most wide spread non-food manufactured products. Although used in many different manufacturing processes, the one principal use in Cardiganshire was for agriculture.

Shipping was also important in Ceredigion, with coal and lime being imported in coastal vessels, and mineral ores and oak bark for tanning being exported.
Shipbuilding in the nineteenth century was an important industry for the area with sailing vessels being built along the shoreline of Llanon, Cardiganshire. Evidence of the former harbour at Llanrhystud to serve the lime kilns is still evident today.

References

  1. 2003 Crab invasion under the spotlight. Cambrian News
  2. Fears that Llanrhystud Beach will be lost. Cambrian News
  3. Llanrhystud – Llanon Lime Kilns over looking beach. Llanrhystud Online